Breathing problems and symptoms can be induced by exercise.
EIB (exercise induced bronchospasm) is sometimes referred to as exercise induced asthma, but is not asthma
EIB (exercise induced bronchospasm) is sometimes referred to as exercise induced asthma, but is not asthma
Understanding EIB

EIB (exercise-induced bronchospasm)

EIB stands for exercise-induced bronchospasm. It is sometimes called exercise-induced asthma. People who experience EIB find it hard to breathe during or after exercise.

Why? When we exercise, cool, dry air moves quickly in and out of our lungs.1 People with EIB may experience a temporary tightening of the airways, which can lead to2:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest tightness

If this happens to you, you're not alone. As many as one in 10 people in America experience EIB, many of whom do not have asthma.3 That's an estimated 30-plus million adults and children,3,4 including some of the world's best athletes. In fact, an eight-time Winter Olympic short-track speed skating medalist competed despite his EIB-related breathing problems.5

EIB doesn't have to slow you down. And EIB treatment doesn't need to be continuous. (After all, EIB breathing issues are short-term and occur only during or after exercise.)2

Talk with your healthcare provider. There are ways to avoid EIB so that you can stay active. One way is to use the ProAir® RespiClick (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder rescue inhaler prior to exercise. Treating proactively with ProAir® RespiClick 15—30 minutes before working out can help prevent EIB.

How does EIB (or exercise-induced asthma) affect people?

EIB can cause temporary coughing, wheezing and chest tightness during or after exercise. Many people who experience EIB may avoid exercising and other physical activity because they're afraid it'll trigger their exercise-related breathing problems. However, a lack of physical exercise can lead to other problems, like obesity or diabetes.6

There's no reason why EIB should keep you from staying active. Speak with your healthcare provider if you or a family member are experiencing exercise-related breathing problems. Our EIB screener can help you identify any exercise-related breathing issues you may have so that you can discuss them with your doctor.

EIB may make you feel frustrated. But the good news is that there are things you can do. For example, using ProAir® RespiClick 15—30 minutes before exercising can help prevent EIB. Ask your doctor if ProAir® RespiClick may be right for you.

Did you know?

Many people who have asthma also experience EIB when they exercise. In these instances, EIB is called exercise-induced asthma. Here's what you should know2:

  • People with asthma often experience EIB, but
  • Experiencing EIB doesn't mean that you have asthma

EIB is not asthma, though the breathing problems associated with EIB may feel similar to asthma symptoms.

How does ProAir® RespiClick help you breathe during exercise?

When you take ProAir® RespiClick before exercise:

  1. The muscles in your airways stay relaxed
  2. More air is able to flow through the airways
  3. You can breathe more freely

The active ingredient in ProAir® RespiClick is a medicine called albuterol, which is inhaled directly into the lungs. Once there, it works quickly to relax the muscles in the airways, allowing more air to pass through.

Tips to train by

Most people with EIB don’t need to limit their physical activity, unless instructed to do so by their healthcare provider. Using ProAir® RespiClick (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder 15—30 minutes before exercising can help prevent or reduce the effects of EIB for two to three hours in most people.

Here are some additional steps you can take to prevent the breathing problems associated with EIB2:

  • Warm up before you start exercising
  • Cool down after you exercise
  • Exercise indoors when pollen counts are high
  • Exercise indoors when the air outside is cold and dry, because it can trigger EIB. If you do exercise in these conditions, wear a scarf around your mouth.
  • Consider getting a flu shot and don’t exercise if you are sick.
  • Keep track of your allergies and take steps to avoid exposure to things that cause allergy symptoms (allergens)
  • Use an asthma controller medication if you have asthma, if prescribed by your healthcare provider, because it may help reduce EIB
  • Make sure that your coaches and trainers are aware that you have asthma or get EIB and know where you keep your ProAir® RespiClick rescue inhaler, so that they know what to do if you start to have symptoms or an attack

APPROVED USES

ProAir® RespiClick (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder is indicated in patients 4 years of age and older for the treatment or prevention of bronchospasm with reversible obstructive airway disease and for the prevention of exercise-induced bronchospasm.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • Do not use ProAir RespiClick® (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder if you are allergic to albuterol sulfate, lactose, or milk proteins. Call your doctor right away if you develop red, itchy bumps on your skin, swelling beneath your skin or in your throat, rash or worsening trouble breathing
  • If your symptoms become significantly worse when you use ProAir RespiClick®, seek medical attention immediately. This may indicate either a worsening of your asthma or a reaction to the medication. Either of these could be life-threatening
  • Do not increase your dose or take extra doses of ProAir RespiClick® without first talking to your healthcare professional
  • Before using ProAir RespiClick®, be sure to tell your healthcare professional if you have a heart, blood, thyroid or seizure disorder, high blood pressure, diabetes, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed
  • ProAir RespiClick® can cause significant heart-related side effects, such as an increase in pulse, blood pressure and/or related symptoms. If you have a heart condition, your healthcare professional will determine if ProAir RespiClick® is right for you
  • Make sure your healthcare professional knows all the medicines you are taking — especially other inhaled medicines, other asthma medicines, heart and blood pressure medicines and drugs that treat depression — because some medicines may interfere with how well your asthma medicines work
  • Common side effects in patients 12 years of age and older taking ProAir RespiClick® include back pain, body aches and pains, upset stomach, sinus headache, and urinary tract infection
  • Common side effects in patients 4 to 11 years of age taking ProAir RespiClick® include upper respiratory infections, mouth and throat pain, and vomiting
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away
  • These are not all of the possible side effects of ProAir RespiClick®. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist
  • You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088

SEE FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION

References:
  1. Departments & Centers. Managing Exercise-Induced Asthma. Available at: http://my.clevelandclinic.org/ccf/media/Files/Sports_Health/Competitive
    %20Edge%20Winter%2008-09.pdf. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  2. Sinha T, David AK. Recognition and management of exercise-induced bronchospasm. Am Fam Physician. 2003;67(4):769-774, 675.
  3. Parsons, JP et al. Prevalence of Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm in a Cohort of Varsity College Athletes. Med Sci Sports Exercise. 2007;39:1487-92.
  4. United States Census Bureau. US & World Population Clocks. 2015. Available at: http://www.census.gov/popclock/. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  5. Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine. US National Library of Medicine. 2013. Available at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/fall13/articles/fall13pg10-11.html. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  6. 79, N, 2011, M. Obesity in children and teens. Obesity in Children and Teens. Available at: http://www.aacap.org/aacap/families_and_youth/facts_for_families/
    facts_for_families_pages/obesity_in_children_and_teens_79.aspx. Accessed March 11, 2016.

ProAir RespiClick® (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder is indicated in patients 4 years of age and older for the treatment or prevention of bronchospasm with reversible obstructive airway disease and for the prevention of exercise-induced bronchospasm.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • Do not use ProAir RespiClick® (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder if you are allergic to albuterol sulfate, lactose, or milk proteins. Call your doctor right away if you develop red, itchy bumps on your skin, swelling beneath your skin or in your throat, rash or worsening trouble breathing
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ProAir RespiClick® (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder is indicated in patients 4 years of age and older for the treatment or prevention of bronchospasm with reversible obstructive airway disease and for the prevention of exercise-induced bronchospasm.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • Do not use ProAir RespiClick® (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Powder if you are allergic to albuterol sulfate, lactose, or milk proteins. Call your doctor right away if you develop red, itchy bumps on your skin, swelling beneath your skin or in your throat, rash or worsening trouble breathing
  • If your symptoms become significantly worse when you use ProAir RespiClick®, seek medical attention immediately. This may indicate either a worsening of your asthma or a reaction to the medication. Either of these could be life-threatening
  • Do not increase your dose or take extra doses of ProAir RespiClick® without first talking to your healthcare professional
  • Before using ProAir RespiClick®, be sure to tell your healthcare professional if you have a heart, blood, thyroid or seizure disorder, high blood pressure, diabetes, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed
  • ProAir RespiClick® can cause significant heart-related side effects, such as an increase in pulse, blood pressure and/or related symptoms. If you have a heart condition, your healthcare professional will determine if ProAir RespiClick® is right for you
  • Make sure your healthcare professional knows all the medicines you are taking — especially other inhaled medicines, other asthma medicines, heart and blood pressure medicines and drugs that treat depression — because some medicines may interfere with how well your asthma medicines work
  • Common side effects in patients 12 years of age and older taking ProAir RespiClick® include back pain, body aches and pains, upset stomach, sinus headache, and urinary tract infection
  • Common side effects in patients 4 to 11 years of age taking ProAir RespiClick® include upper respiratory infections, mouth and throat pain, and vomiting
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away
  • These are not all of the possible side effects of ProAir RespiClick®. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist
  • You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088

SEE FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION